Monday, July 17, 2017

Episode #037:

Dave Van Dyke
Founder/President, Bridge Ratings
Bridging the Audience Gap



Dave Van Dyke
Is your audience moving away from you?

The attacks are not just online anymore.  Media reseach sherpa Dave Van Dyke offers a look at the ‘audience gap’ between listener usage pattenrs, where radio is and where it needs to go to remain competitive, if not dominant. Dave was raised in radio, showcasing talents on-air, in programming, sales, marketing and research. After over two decades with posts including VP /GM at KCBS/Los Angeles along with senior management positions at Westinghouse, Viacom, Infinity and the ABC Radio Networks, he started Bridge Ratings and Research.

Now he’s focused on every facet of radio, audio and Internet audience engagement and is widely recognized for his ability to forecast and gauge media Bridge Ratings conducts several studies annually to determine the impact of a variety of media which compete for consumers' time.  

All of this data is rolled into the annual “Bridge Ratings New Media Gauntlet” which we link to below.


This episode will help you bridge the growing audience gap, for survival of your station brand ─ and your career!










Dave's LinkedIn profile


Click HERE for the 
2017 Bridge Media Guantlet report







Bonus Content:


Video:  Is JohnJay Spiderman?



A great 'real life' moment gives the audience of previous Brandwidth guests
JohnJay and Rich 
an inside look at the show in action, and generates great multi-platform exposure.



by David Martin

Accents

Here’s a powerful trade secret. Keep in mind, it only works 100% of the time. Every market has its own unique characteristics. While it may be said that all markets adopt and integrate many of the same national brands (e.g., McDonalds, Walmart, Home Depot, Best Buy), it is also true each market has its homegrown favorites. Having lived in Portland I still thirst for the taste of Burgerville product.

One audio trait homegrown in each market is the local accent, the local vernacular. In Dallas and Atlanta it’s common to hear “Y’all” used on everyday conversation. You won’t hear that in New York. In New York people stand not “in” line but “on” line. There have been national studies by beverage brands to determine what category their liquid competes in. Is it “soda” or “pop” or “cola”? You get the idea. Every market has a “sound.”

Allow me to dare a guess that you have been told more than once “You have a radio voice.” It’s because having worked in audio you have developed a certain discipline in your speech. You have likely reached the point that you no longer notice your practiced pronunciations. You have, in fact, created a professional voice which is different from the voices people normally hear in their conversations.

Radio stations are heavy with professional voices. From the on-air talent, to promos and commercials smooth and often remarkably distinct voices fill the air. What is usually not heard are everyday voices of the locals. On the listener side of the radio these voices “pop” or jump out when they hit the air. The listener ear detects or notices these voices, a degree of dissonance is created.

Getting the sound of your market on your air should always be a priority. Beyond your use of local vernacular, find creative ways to get the voices of locals on your air. It’s no accident that many successful talk shows and morning shows on music stations have a “cast” of contributing listeners. The legendary Fred Winston had a great ear for finding colorful listeners, including ones with the strong Chicago “dese, dem and dose” accents, via the request lines. He would often record them asking an obvious question to set up a set element “Hey, Fred are you ever gonna tell us if it’s going to snow today or not, jeeeze?”

Does your station have an accent (or three)? It needs to and should.